Frank Granata: What about workers' beliefs?

July 20, 2013 

Hobby Lobby is asking the courts for a variance from providing their employees certain health measures under the Affordable Care Act. Their approach is no different than any other religious entity wanting to hide under the protective blanket of the First Amendment. They all use a "cafeteria"-styled one: Picture them in the proverbial serving line walking with tray in hand saying, "I'll take some of this and some of this, but none of that nor that." The onus in agreeing to this exemption will open the flood gates allowing businesses owned by Jehovah's Witnesses to deny covering blood transfusions, and Christian Scientists from providing any medical care whatsoever for their workers.

But there is a highly impractical solution, for those seeking such selective variations:

(1) Hire only those persons who belong to exactly the same sect or cult as the employer.

(2) Although money has no conscience, they're to sell only to those of the same particular denomination as the business owner.

How ironically convenient that while Hobby Lobby is asking the courts to respect their beliefs, they are stomping and trampling underfoot the beliefs of their own hired help. Tenet restraints are personal acceptances and should never be barriers to optimal health care for those of differing doctrinal influences.

>FRANK GRANATA

>Merced

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