The Buzz: Stockton mayor tells reporter to take a hike from board meeting

July 26, 2013 

5C26BUZZ

Stockton Mayor Anthony Silva apparently didn't want a Stockton Record reporter to cover a Boys and Girls Club meeting.

BRIAN BAER — Special to The Bee

Stockton's controversial Mayor Anthony Silva is making news again – by calling the city cops after a Stockton Record reporter was denied access to a meeting of an organization the mayor heads.

The beleaguered city's mercurial mayor apparently didn't like a Record reporter, Roger Phillips, attending a meeting of the Boys and Girls Club, which he runs. Phillips left the meeting after Silva and the board president told him he would not be able to attend, said Record Editor Mike Klocke. Silva called police after the reporter had left, Klocke said.

Record columnist Michael Fitzgerald describes Monday's incident in this blog posting:

"Phillips had legitimate business there. Silva's leadership of the club – which is losing clients and facing a sexual harassment suit – bears on his qualifications to lead the city. The fact that his job is one of two full-time positions he holds, though he is paid to be Stockton's full-time mayor, also has a bearing. When the paper covers Silva running the Boys and Girls Club, it is also covering him not running the city of Stockton.

"... You can ask a reporter to leave without encumbering the overtaxed Stockton Police Department. We've been kicked out of better places."

– Dan Walters

LABOR WATCH

After more than a year of talks, the University of California has imposed labor conditions on the union that represents 13,000 patient-care workers at its five hospitals, including UC Davis Medical Center. The terms, retroactive to July 1, shift more pension and retiree health care costs to workers – and gives two pay raises this year. The union called UC's move a "full frontal assault" on workers.

– Jon Ortiz

WORTH REPEATING

"Most people give contributions, not because it makes them feel warm and fuzzy inside, but because they think there is some way that they can benefit from this candidate being in public office."

JESSICA LEVINSON, Loyola Law School professor, to KPCC radio, about former lawmaker Tom Calderon donating $26,000 to the campaign of board candidates at the Central Basin Municipal Water District. The district paid him more than $1 million in consulting fees over a decade.

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