In this Oct. 5, 2018, file photo, the U. S. Supreme Court building stands quietly before dawn in Washington. The Constitution says you can’t be tried twice for the same offense. And yet Terance Gamble is sitting in prison today because he was prosecuted separately by Alabama and the federal government for having a gun after an earlier robbery conviction. The Supreme Court considered Gamble’s case Thursday, Dec. 6. The outcome could have a spillover effect on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.
In this Oct. 5, 2018, file photo, the U. S. Supreme Court building stands quietly before dawn in Washington. The Constitution says you can’t be tried twice for the same offense. And yet Terance Gamble is sitting in prison today because he was prosecuted separately by Alabama and the federal government for having a gun after an earlier robbery conviction. The Supreme Court considered Gamble’s case Thursday, Dec. 6. The outcome could have a spillover effect on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. J. David Ake AP
In this Oct. 5, 2018, file photo, the U. S. Supreme Court building stands quietly before dawn in Washington. The Constitution says you can’t be tried twice for the same offense. And yet Terance Gamble is sitting in prison today because he was prosecuted separately by Alabama and the federal government for having a gun after an earlier robbery conviction. The Supreme Court considered Gamble’s case Thursday, Dec. 6. The outcome could have a spillover effect on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. J. David Ake AP