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Nov. 1 in Merced history: Atwater rolls over Modesto JV, 32-0

November 1, 1958: Atwater High School's football team had a new nickname, new colors and a new way of playing Thursday night.

The Falcons played hard-nosed football for four full periods to whip Modesto High's junior varsity, 32-0 at Atwater Memorial Ball Park.

Although the uniforms remained maroon and white the school colors are now blue and white/ This is what the student body decreed this week, at the same time they chose the name "Falcons."

A falcon is used for hunting and the Falcons were on thehunt Thursday night. They recovered three fumbles (one setting up a touchdown), intercepted a lateral for a TD, and held Modesto to a net four yards gained on the ground.

Fullback Joe Lloyd, who broke Dos Palos JV's back the week before with a 59-yard touchdown scamper, went into the end run of 41 yards. He was aided by a fine block by guard Mike Holcomb as he turned the corner.

November 1, 1983

COUNTY BOARD EYES ALCOHOLISM PROGRAM:

Merced County supervisors are exploring ways to force drinking drivers off the road, with techniques they hope will include mandatory attendance in a $7,000-drug and alcohol treatment program.

The topic came up in discussion of the county's second offender program for people caught and twice convicted of drunken driving.

Supervisors approved taking over the program from a private service provider and voted to explore costs of launching a billboard and public information campaign.

Supervisor Fred Wack wanted to know why Merced County judges were not sentencing drinking drivers to the 28-day Phoenix Program at Merced Community Medical Center.

Troy Dean Fox, clinical services manager for the county's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center, said it is up to the judge to sentence convicted drunken drivers to programs as conditions of probation.

He said some judges already sentence drivers to intensive alcohol rehabilitation at the county-run program called the Ranch.

He noted some drunken drivers might prefer 10 days in jail rather than a costly rehabilitation program, such as Phoenix.

Overall, Fox said, Merced County judges have been strict on the drinking driver and were sentencing them to jail.

In board action Tuesday, supervisors voted to take over the second offender drinking driving program from a private service provider, CARE Schools, Inc.

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