SUN-STAR PHOTO BY LISA JAMES
ldjames@mercedsun-star.com
Tinikling dancers perform at UC Merced's 2009 Asian Fest.

Tinikling, the national dance, is considered to be the oldest of the Philippine folk dances. It also comes from the countryside. The dance takes its name and movements from the "tinikling" bird as it roams between grass steams, crushes tree branches and avoids traps set by rice farmers.

Dancers skip gracefully back and forth while trying to avoid getting their feet caught by two bamboo poles.

There are many tall tales about the dance's origins. According to one story, Filipino farm workers who displeased their Spanish masters had their feet smashed by two bamboo poles.When the poles were apart, the workers would jump to avoid getting hurt. Thus, this dance was born.

April 4th, 2010
SUN-STAR PHOTO BY LISA JAMES ldjames@mercedsun-star.com Tinikling dancers perform at UC Merced's 2009 Asian Fest. Tinikling, the national dance, is considered to be the oldest of the Philippine folk dances. It also comes from the countryside. The dance takes its name and movements from the "tinikling" bird as it roams between grass steams, crushes tree branches and avoids traps set by rice farmers. Dancers skip gracefully back and forth while trying to avoid getting their feet caught by two bamboo poles. There are many tall tales about the dance's origins. According to one story, Filipino farm workers who displeased their Spanish masters had their feet smashed by two bamboo poles.When the poles were apart, the workers would jump to avoid getting hurt. Thus, this dance was born. April 4th, 2010 Merced Sun-Star
SUN-STAR PHOTO BY LISA JAMES ldjames@mercedsun-star.com Tinikling dancers perform at UC Merced's 2009 Asian Fest. Tinikling, the national dance, is considered to be the oldest of the Philippine folk dances. It also comes from the countryside. The dance takes its name and movements from the "tinikling" bird as it roams between grass steams, crushes tree branches and avoids traps set by rice farmers. Dancers skip gracefully back and forth while trying to avoid getting their feet caught by two bamboo poles. There are many tall tales about the dance's origins. According to one story, Filipino farm workers who displeased their Spanish masters had their feet smashed by two bamboo poles.When the poles were apart, the workers would jump to avoid getting hurt. Thus, this dance was born. April 4th, 2010 Merced Sun-Star