California

New sprinklers will soon be more expensive in California. Here’s why

Water-saving tips for your sprinklers

In this installment of The Sacramento Bee's Water-Wise Homeowners video series, landscape architect Donna Dowson teaches drought-conscious homeowners how to adjust sprinkler systems and gives other tips on how to conserve water while maintaining a
Up Next
In this installment of The Sacramento Bee's Water-Wise Homeowners video series, landscape architect Donna Dowson teaches drought-conscious homeowners how to adjust sprinkler systems and gives other tips on how to conserve water while maintaining a

Californians, your yard sprinklers are about to get a little bit more expensive. The good news is, your water bill is about to get cheaper.

California on Wednesday officially adopted new regulations which are estimated to save more than 400 million gallons of water per day within 10 years, enough to supply San Diego, the second largest city in the state, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Beginning in 2020, spray sprinklers will be required to be sold with a component that restricts the water flow to as close as possible to 30 pounds per square inch (PSI), the manufacturer-recommended level.

“California’s standard requires new spray sprinkler bodies to come with built-in pressure regulation, so that the water pressure reaching the sprinkler nozzle is always close to the manufacturer’s recommended operating pressure,” according to the NRDC.

The pressure regulating component will add about $3 to the sprinkler’s price tag, “but the cost is offset by water savings within the first year, making the technology highly cost-effective over the life of the product,” according to the NRDC.

California joins Colorado, Hawaii, Vermont and Washington in adopting the new sprinkler regulations.

Related stories from Merced Sun-Star

Andrew Sheeler covers California’s unique political climate for McClatchy. He has covered crime and politics from Interior Alaska to North Dakota’s oil patch to the rugged coast of southern Oregon. He attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
  Comments