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Merced honors Bishop Amey, a highly respected civil rights leader

Gwen Amey listens as Mayor Mike Murphy speaks about her late husband, civil rights leader Bishop Dwight Amey, at City Hall on Monday.
Gwen Amey listens as Mayor Mike Murphy speaks about her late husband, civil rights leader Bishop Dwight Amey, at City Hall on Monday. tmiller@mercedsunstar.com

Merced’s elected officials this week honored a central leader of civil rights causes in Merced and longtime bishop of a south Merced church.

The proclamation read by Mayor Mike Murphy noted the service and efforts of Bishop Dwight Amey, who died Feb. 17. The 71-year-old was a retired bishop of the New Faith Tabernacle church on 10th Street.

Amey’s widow, Gwen, and other family members accepted the proclamation in the council’s chambers. The bishop was honored with a standing ovation by the audience.

“He was a great man. We miss him dearly,” Gwen Amey said. “I appreciate the love that you all had for him.”

He was a great man. We miss him dearly.

Gwen Amey, wife of late Bishop Dwight Amey

Amey, who came to Merced in 1968, was integral in bringing to the community the first march honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., which is organized annually by the Martin Luther King Jr. Committee. He also helped lead the charge to put King’s name on a street in the heart of downtown Merced.

A 6-acre park on Blix Avenue in south Merced was named after him a decade ago, according to Sun-Star archives.

The proclamation noted Amey’s service in the Army, civil rights leadership and “his investments in the community that have educated and improved the quality of life of the citizens of Merced,” Murphy said.

Thaddeus Miller: 209-385-2453, @thaddeusmiller

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