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Family couldn’t find $1,060 saved for football tickets. Then they checked the shredder

Ben and Jackee Belnap saved up $1,060 over a year to afford season football tickets to Utah Utes games at the University of Utah — but then their 2-year-old son Leo put the cash in a shredder and destroyed it.
Ben and Jackee Belnap saved up $1,060 over a year to afford season football tickets to Utah Utes games at the University of Utah — but then their 2-year-old son Leo put the cash in a shredder and destroyed it. Screenshot from Ben Belnap's Twitter

A Utah family says their 2-year-old son destroyed a years-worth of money saved up for football season tickets in a matter of seconds.

Ben and Jackie Benlap had been saving up so they could afford to pay back Ben’s parents, who bought the couple season tickets to watch the football team at the University of Utah, according to Good4Utah. They were ready to pay on Sunday, but couldn’t find the envelope of money.

Then, Jackie said, she found something that left her “devastated” and feeling “sick,” according to Good4Utah.

Ben said he was desperately looking through his house for the money — and then Jackie looked inside the shredder, KSL-TV reported.

“I’m digging through the trash and she hollers and says, ‘I found it,’” Ben told KSL-TV. “She’s holding the shredder and she says, ‘I think the money is in here.’”

Ben posted an image of the shredded cash on Twitter, where it received hundreds of re-tweets and over 1,000 likes.

Jackie said they knew their 2-year-old son Leo was responsible because he “helps me shred junk mail and just things with our name on it, or important documents we want to get rid of,” according to KSL-TV.

Meanwhile, Ben is just looking for the positives.

“Honestly in my heart, I said someday this is going to be really funny,” he said, according to Good4Utah.

And there might be at least some good news. Ben responded to his original tweet about the ordeal and wrote that he reached out to a person in the U.S. Treasury Department and learned that he might be able to get some — or all — of the shredded money back.

The department’s website says that you can mail in destroyed currency and attempt to have it reimbursed. But it can take up to three years.

For Ben, the painful discovery will always give him a unique story to tell.

“Most people they say oh, a kid drew crayon on the wall or something,” he said, according to Good4Utah. “I’ve never heard of a kid shredding a grand.”

Before a big game counterfeit tickets tend to pop up. Here's how to make sure your tickets aren't too good to be true. (Video by Candi Bolden Music by Bensound.com)

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