National

Divers clearing river in Portland discover 20 sunken e-scooters, photos show

How to ride Lime electric scooters

Lime helps redefine the first and last mile transportation through the use of dockless electric scooters. Watch how to use the new method of transportation.
Up Next
Lime helps redefine the first and last mile transportation through the use of dockless electric scooters. Watch how to use the new method of transportation.

Divers combing the bottom of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, on Tuesday discovered a collection of sunken electric scooters.

A Multnomah County dive team was clearing a “sea wall” near the Hawthorne Bridge in downtown Portland when divers found an estimated 20 scooters abandoned in the water, according to a Facebook post from the Multnomah Sheriff’s Office.

Photos posted by authorities show that many of the scooters were worse for wear.

But at least one scooter was still operational, at least in part: The Sheriff’s Office wrote in a Twitter post that “Sergeant Dangler says the lights are still working on this.”

“It was recovered from the bottom of the Willamette River today!” the Twitter post said. “I wonder if it will still run?”

Five companies have put nearly 2,000 e-scooters on the city’s streets as part of a trial program, KATU reports.

Not everyone is happy about the proliferating scooters, though.

An Instagram account has popped up and attracted nearly 3,000 followers by documenting “scooter chaos” in Portland. Examples of the chaos shown on the page include scooters hanging from utility poles, broken on sidewalks and parked in a liquor store.

One photo posted earlier in June appears to show people pulling a scooter from the river themselves.

A representative for scooter company Lime said that the start-up has fished scooters out of the river as well — and “had success with using a grappling hook in the past, if necessary,” KOIN reports.

Related stories from Merced Sun-Star

Jared Gilmour is a McClatchy national reporter based in San Francisco. He covers everything from health and science to politics and crime. He studied journalism at Northwestern University and grew up in North Dakota.
  Comments