Social Media

Temperatures to top 100 as heat wave strikes Merced, Central Valley

SUN-STAR PHOTO BY MARCI STENBERG
Kenney Hicks, 6, gets some help with his swimming lessons from a family friend Nicholas Farley, 19, in Bear Creek near the G Street bridge, Monday, June 20, 2100 afternoon.
SUN-STAR PHOTO BY MARCI STENBERG Kenney Hicks, 6, gets some help with his swimming lessons from a family friend Nicholas Farley, 19, in Bear Creek near the G Street bridge, Monday, June 20, 2100 afternoon. Merced Sun-Star

Here come the hundreds.

The summer heat has officially arrived in the Northern San Joaquin Valley as temperatures are set to soar into triple digits today for the first time this year.

Merced weather is expected to stay there today and Wednesday.

"It's the first day of summer, and it will actually feel like it," said Kathy Hoxsie, a forecaster with the National Weather Service. "We've been saying winterlike weather into the spring. But now we can just say it's summer weather, period."

Forecasts call for 101 today, 100 Wednesday, with temperatures falling back to a relatively balmy 94 on Thursday. The weekend weather is expected to be in the upper 80s.

The warm weather means increased demand in electricity as well as more snow runoff from the Sierra.

"We've been kind of spoiled. It's been nice this spring," said Melissa Williams, spokeswoman for the Modesto Irrigation District. "But we've got some hot days coming up and that's always hard with electric bills."

For valley residents that means cranking up the air conditioning and staying cool any way possible.

Williams said homeowners can take a few simple steps to keep AC costs under control during the short heat wave. Keep the thermostat at 78 when home and 85 when away. Close doors and windows. Draw the shades. Don't turn on the oven or stove if possible. And check the air conditioning filter to make sure it is running efficiently.

Those seeking relief from the heat might be tempted to take a dip in area rivers and streams. But officials caution that they will be running quickly and coldly thanks to the increased runoff from the huge Sierra snowpack.

Jon Ericson, hydrology chief in the Department of Water Resources Flood Management Division, said runoff should peak in the next three days to a week.

"Snowmelt time has arrived," he said. "And it's cold water that is coming out of the snowmelt. Tributaries upstream will be high water and cold water."

Ericson said area reservoirs have worked all spring to make space to accommodate this year's large snowpack. He said river levels are expected to rise in the San Joaquin basin in the next two weeks, but there are no flood warnings downstream from area reservoirs as yet.

Related stories from Merced Sun-Star

  Comments