California

Schwarzenegger aide swings at Trump official — ‘You can talk when you’ win California

Arnold Schwarzenegger: Trump not ‘up my alley’

Former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger says Republicans need to distance themselves from President Donald Trump in order to move forward. He visited Sacramento on Monday to urge the party to go in a more moderate direction.
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Former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger says Republicans need to distance themselves from President Donald Trump in order to move forward. He visited Sacramento on Monday to urge the party to go in a more moderate direction.

When Brad Parscale, President Donald Trump’s 2020 campaign manager, spoke before a gathering of the California Republican Party this weekend, it was to predict that Trump’s family would found “a dynasty that will last for decades” in national Republican politics.

That speech may have earned him a standing ovation, but at least one person was unimpressed.

Daniel Ketchell, chief of staff for Arnold Schwarzenegger, California’s last elected GOP governor, took to Twitter to call Parscale out on behalf of his boss.

“Brad Parscale, whose candidate got 31.6% of the vote here, should probably keep @Schwarzenegger’s name out of his mouth. You can talk when you get 55.9% of the vote,” Ketchell tweeted.

Ketchell later commented on how a photo of Parscale speaking showed many empty seats.

“I’m not saying it wasn’t a full room but good for him giving those 18 people his message that will absolutely lose California,” Ketchell wrote.

The former “governator” also criticized Trump, specifically the president’s environmental policy, in a weekend column in The Washington Post.

Twelve years ago, Schwarzenegger warned that California’s Republicans were “dying at the box office” and the only way to survive was to move to the political center.

That sentiment was relayed over the weekend by Republican Assemblyman Chad Mayes, R-Yucca Valley. Mayes tweeted a link to a new story about Schwarzenegger’s dire warning, saying that, “for any Republican still wishing to rebuild the party in California this is a must read.”

Parscale rebuffed that approach Saturday, arguing that while the party must adapt in California, it must also continue “keeping the conservative values we believe in.”

Parscale acknowledged that California will be an uphill battle in 2020, (“This is not a swing state,” he said), but added that “there is a lot of work to be done” to build a strong Republican volunteer network in the Golden State.

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Andrew Sheeler covers California’s unique political climate for McClatchy. He has covered crime and politics from Interior Alaska to North Dakota’s oil patch to the rugged coast of southern Oregon. He attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
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